Lost: “316”

This episode managed to be compelling despite having very little screen time for the island and lots of screen time for Jack. That’s quite an accomplishment.

Spoilers from tonight’s episode after the jump.

Links and Miscellanea:

  • The geniuses at Ace of Cakes baked a killer confection to commerate Lost’s 100th episode and Jorge Garcia blogged about it.

  • People who are fans of both Henry Ian Cusick (“Desmond”) and Byran Fuller (Pushing Daisies, Wonderfalls) might be interested in checking out the straight-to-DVD Dead Like Me movie.

  • Jeremy Davies (“Faraday”) is the focus of this week’s official video podcast.

  • In the official audio podcast, we were given the following tidbits: the “temple” we saw in last week’s episode should be thought of as the “outer wall” of the Temple, with the Temple itself a little farther off; Cuse and Lindelof confirm that the French team did return “a little wacky” from their trip beneath the Temple; “316” is a Cuse/Lindelof-penned episode, as is the next episode (“The Life and Death of Jeremy Bentham”) and these episodes can be watched in either order; Theresa Spenser, Faraday’s former research assistant, will be making another appearance on the show.

  • NY Mag’s Vulture blog points out that Fox is going to try to kill off Lost by moving American Idol back to the late-prime-time slot. I’ve only ever made it through a single season of American Idol (the Carrie Underwood/Bo Bice season), so I could really care less. Doc Artz explained recently why ratings are not something Lost fans need to fret to much about. I could see ABC reacting by moving Lost to Thursdays, but cancellation is not a rational possibility at this point.

  • I like this analysis of Christian/Not-Christian, even though I’m not ready to commit to any sort of theory yet.

  • This USA Today article reviews the current state of Lost and 24 and calls them “the two best shows on TV.”

Observations and speculations:

  • The title of the episode, “316,” is a reference to the Ajira flight number that will bring the Oceanic 5 (O6 minus Aaron) back to the island. Others have pointed out that it may also be a reference to John 3:16, perhaps the most famous verse in Christianity. In some translations, such as the New Century Version, this verse translates to: “God loved the world so much that he gave his one and only Son so that whoever believes in him may not be lost, but have eternal life.” This verse also dovetails with the sacrifice theme that is dominating Locke’s plot line at the moment.

  • In case you don’t remember (and it’s been over four years, so it’s understandable), the openning shots were a direct reference to the first ever scene from lost, where we see Jack’s eye openning and he’s laying in a bamboo forest, face-up, in a suit and tie. This motif of opening an episode with a tight shot of a character’s eye as it opens has been used repeatedly.


  • Jack finds Hurley flailing about in a little jungle pool beneath a waterfall. This appears to be the same lagoon where Kate and Sawyer decided to go swimming during episode 1.12, “Whatever the Case May Be,” and found the suitcase full of guns and Kate’s personal effects.

  • Hurley is clutching a guitar case, though we don’t know why. It is, of course, the same guitar case he brought with him on Ajira flight 316 and set down in the seat next to him, but we don’t know what is in it or what significance it has. Charlie brought a guitar case (and guitar) with him on the Oceanic flight, but we’ve never seen any evidence that Hurley plays the guitar.

  • The first scene and the last scene play slightly differently. In the first seen, Kate asks, “Are we –?” and Jack replies, “Yeah, we’re back.” When the scene replays at the end of the episode, this dialog is missing. It may just be a continuity error, but it seems like a rather conspicuous one. Couldn’t the editor just replay the same video from earlier in the episode?

  • The painting on display in Ms. Hawking’s church above the alter is “The Incredulity of Saint Thomas,” by the Italian painter Caravaggio. The painting dates to 1602 and is one of the most famous paintings of the baroque period. Thematically, the story of doubting Thomas (retold by Ben later in the episode) relates to Jack, the erstwhile man of science who will not believe until he has the empirical proof. In Locke’s “suicide note,” his only words to Jack are a message conveying his wish that Jack had believed. Ben tells Jack later that everyone believes sooner or later. Is Locke’s note a posthumous manipulation of Jack? It sort of has the smell of Ben’s modus operandi on it.

  • Ms. Hawking leads Sun, Jack, Ben and Desmond down to a DHARMA station hidden beneath the church, called the lamppost. This is no doubt a reference to The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe and the lamppost that lies in the forest just beyond the wardrobe that acts as the portal for the Pevensies children’s first entrances into Narnia. Likewise, the Lamppost Station acted as the DHARMA initiative’s first portal into the world of the show’s mysterious island.

  • Ms. Hawking says that Ben’s “probably not” telling the truth when Ben denies knowing about the Lamppost Station. We really don’t know if he’s lying or not because when Ben visited her in episode 2.1 at the church, their meeting took place above ground, in the chapel. I agree with Eloise, though. He’s probably lying.

  • Jack glances at an old black-and-white photo on the wall of the Lamppost Station that is captioned, “9/23/54 – U.S. ARMY – OP 264 – TOP SECRET – EYES ONLY.” This photograph dates to the era of the “Jughead” H-bomb and young Charles Widmore’s time on the island.

  • Ms. Hawking mentions that the Lamppost Station was constructed over a pocked of electromagnetic energy connected to similar pockets all over the word. No doubt, one of these is in Tunisia, one off the coast of Madagascar, etc.

  • The blue binder that Ms. Hawking is carrying during this scene says “FLIGHT PLAN” on it.

  • Ms. Hawking tells Desmond that “the island isn’t done with you yet.” Desmond remembers Ms. Hawking, and he’s having none of it. Good for him. Of course, we know that the island has a way of gettign what it wants.

  • The fact that we now know that the Oceanic 5 were on Ajira Airways opens up the possibility that it was Jack and company (or some of their fellow passengers) who were in the canoes that shot at the Left Behinders a few episodes back.

  • All the stuff about “recreating as best you can the circumstances” of Oceanic 815 seems like superstitious hokum. As Faraday noted last episode, this is “where we leave science behind.” Actually, it’s way, way beyond that point.

  • In Ms. Hawking’s office (or rectory, or whatever) there are several Virgin Mary statuettes. I think this image has appeared enough times (in Charlie’s dream, in the heroin-smuggling drug plane, in the Reyes’ house, and likely in Desmond’s monastery) that it can be considered a motif.

  • Ms. Hawking tells Jack that “John is going to be a proxy” for Jack’s father. In the podcast, Cuse and Lindelof suggested that this is a key concept, and hinted that this may be a key to understanding the existence of the walking, talking dead. It’s certainly something to consider. Are Christian/Claire/Yemi et al. “proxies” for Jacob and/or the island?

  • I really liked Ms. Hawking’s line, “Stop telling yourself how ridiculous it is!” That’s good advice right there from Lost’s writers to its viewers.

  • Ben tells Jack (ominously) in the chapel that he “made a promise to an old friend” of his, “just a loose end that needs tying up.” And then the next time we see him, he’s bloodied and injured. My first thought was that Ben intended to make good on his promise to Charles Widmore that he would kill his daughter in revenge for Widmore murdering Alex. Having just seen Desmond, Ben no doubt knows that Penny must be near. We don’t find out whether he succeeded.

  • When Jack visits his grandfather, Ray, in an assisted-living facility, he is watching a magic show, and the magician unveils a white rabbit. This is another motif. “White Rabbit” was the name of the episode in season one where Jack first sees a vision of Christian Sheppard on the island. Ben uses a white rabbit to play mind games with Sawyer at the Hydra Station in season 3, and a similar white rabbit shows up in the Orchid Station training film we were introduced to last season. The symbol for the Looking Glass station is a white rabbit and there are multiple references to Alice in Wonderland (and it’s white rabbit) in Lost.

  • We now know why Christian Sheppard’s corpse was wearing a formal suit and white tennis shoes (i.e., because Jack didn’t think his father was worth buying a nice pair of dress shoes for when he went to Australia to retrieve his body). That’s a nice answer to a questing that was raised very early in the series.

  • Kate breaks into Jack’s apartment to tell Jack that she’s going to return with him back to the island. We don’t know why, but we can infer it has something to do with Aaron and a bargain she’s struck. We do know that Kate does not want to tell Jack what has happened to Aaron. I’m guessing we’ll find out soon—maybe even next episode.

  • Further evidence of my theory that Ben killed or attempted to kill Penny: when he calls Jack, after being “sidetracked,” it’s from a payphone at a marina. It’s probably the same marina where Desmond and Penny docked their boat. Ben is not a nice guy.

  • The Indian-looking man who tells Jack, “my condolances,” and then is told to buckle up by Hurley later on the plane, seems like he’s going to be an important character. Keep your eyes out for him. He’s played on the show by Said Taghmaoui, a well known actor in France, and his character’s name is Caesar.

  • You know, it doesn’t seem that Ben delivered on his promise for Ms. Hawking to show Sun evidence that Jin is still alive. I wonder if the whole thing was just a bluff.

  • At the airport, Hurley is reading “Y: El Ultimo Hombre,” a Spanish-languish version of Brian K. Vaughan’s excellent comic “Y: The Last Man.” Vaughan is now a writer for Lost, and Cuse and Lindelof have mentioned that it was Vaughan’s “Y” and “Deus Ex Machina” (also the title of a Lost episode) that attracted them to his work. The back cover of the comic book is reminiscent of Desmond’s days in the hatch, when he would wear a hazmat suit whenever he went outside.

  • I like the fact that Hurley bought all of the 78 open seats on the flight. A truly humanitarian thing to do, preventing innocent travelers from either death or condemnation to freaky island life.

  • On the plane, there are interesting paralells to the original flight. Instead of Kate, it is Sayid that is being transported as a prisoner. (How was this managed? And why would a prisoner be on a flight to Guam—unless maybe it was a stopover and Sayid was being extradicted to some foreign country.) Hurley and his guitar case seem like they are a proxy for Charlie (who couldn’t make the flight due to death). Incidentally, Jack is seated in seat 8-C.

  • I loved that Frank Lapidus was the pilot. Recall that Lapidus used to fly commercial for Oceanic Airlines and was a friend of the pilot on flight 815. Frank didn’t seem to be in on the expedition and was shocked to see the Oceanic 5 on the plane. He didn’t take long to figure out the implications, though. (As an aside, I liked him better with a beard.)

  • On the plane, Ben is reading James Joyce’s Ulysses, which is a retelling of Homer’s epic about a hero who travels for years and overcomes obstacles to eventually return to his island home.

  • Incidentally, Ben’s facetious response to Jack’s question, “How can you read?” is a lie. Ben’s mother, Emily Linus, did not teach him to read. She was killed in childbirth outside of Portland, Oregon.

  • So what are we to make of Locke’s final words to Jack, “I wish you had believed me”? Kind of pithy, but not very deep.

  • In the plane, there is a loud, magnetic humming and buzzing and everyting goes white. This appears to be an island-related electromagnetic “incident.” Unlike Oceanic flight 815, however, we do not see the plane break apart, nor do we see it crash. Jack, Hurely and Kate do not remember the crash, nor do they know anyting about any wreckage or what happened to the other passengers.

  • I couldn’t identify the name of the song being played on the DHARMA bus’s radio. I wonder if it was Geronimo Jackson.

  • It looks like Jin is now a DHARMA “workman.” Nice jumpsuit. I suppose we can infer from this that the Left Behinders are either still skipping through time, or they are stuck in the 1970s.

So, my hunch is that next week’s episode will go over many of the same events, only from different character’s perspectives (Locke, Kate, Hurley and Sayid). I’m kind of anxious to get back to the on-island adventures, but this episode did a good job of telling the story that needed to be told. Hopefully, next week will add new and interesting layers.

Anyone notice anything I missed? Have any thoughts to share?

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48 thoughts on “Lost: “316”

  1. Thanks as usual, BTD Greg, for this recap. I don’t know what I’d do without them. My own kids, ages 8 & 9 exclaimed when they saw Jack lying in the jungle: “The opening shot of the first episode!” They noticed it before me! I love the whole circularity of it. They also noticed they landed in the Kate / Sawyer lagoon immediately, which I hadn’t realized.

    The guitar case is definitely a reference to Charlie: do you think Charlie asked Hurley to go? As far as we know, none of the others made contact with Hurley after his release.

    The big question for me is where is Aaron? I’m thinking either with Claire’s mom, or maybe with Penny/Desmond, but if Penny’s dead, this wouldn’t make sense. Where else could Aaron be?

    Sayid was in custody like kate was originally, and did you notice that the police officer who was taking him in was sort of an Ana Lucia type character? Do you think Ben arranged Sayid to be arrested and transported?

    I was thinking during the episode that the O5 were transported to the island during the bright light time shift and the plane didn’t crash, but of course it probably did crash – in 2007 (or whatever year is the “present”). The O5 were sent back to the Dharma era, but were Caesar, Frank, new Ana Lucia, etc?

    In the previews we see Ben assisting with John’s suicide. I’m anxious to find out a lot more about their little interplay.

  2. My first thought was that Ben intended to make good on his promise to Charles Widmore that he would kill his daughter in revenge for Widmore murdering Alex. Having just seen Desmond, Ben no doubt knows that Penny must be near. We don’t find out whether he succeeded.

    That was my thought too. Ben really is not a nice guy.

    I like the fact that Hurley bought all of the 78 open seats on the flight. A truly humanitarian thing to do, preventing innocent travelers from either death or condemnation to freaky island life.

    Now he is a nice guy. Plus he is like the only one who keeps protesting that Ben is around. Hurley is on to something. I just wish the other characters would realize this.

    It looks like Jin is now a DHARMA “workman.” Nice jumpsuit. I suppose we can infer from this that the Left Behinders are either still skipping through time, or they are stuck in the 1970s.

    It wasn’t a jump back to the 70s. We don’t know exactly to what time, but I’m guessing sometime in the 80s, and Jin has been with the Dharma boys for some time. This doesn’t bode well for the future, if Jin and the others are a part of this Dharma group. Remember, so is Ben, and he ends up killing all the Dharma people.

    It seems that Jack, Hurley and Kate went back in time. We don’t know if the others went back to the same period in time. Remember, with all that skipping that Locke and his group went through, it wasn’t the same as what Jin experienced. Jin jumped “conveniently” to see Rousseau’s group, and then “conveniently” to see their demise. (hence my view that the writers were using time travel as a convenient deus ex machina to pull things together).

    I would be surprised if (as we see from next week’s preview) Locke and the other survivors of flight 316 are in the same time period as Jack, Hurley and Kate. Maybe they did, but the writers have been adding all sorts of complexity and confusion with all this time skipping.

    So, my hunch is that next week’s episode will go over many of the same events, only from different character’s perspectives (Locke, Kate, Hurley and Sayid)

    Next week we’ll see Locke’s story apparently.

  3. If Jack was told to recreate the flight as much as possible, maybe Hurley was told the same thing: The Guitar case “was” Charlie.

  4. Was the agent with Sayid on the plane the same person who forced Sayid to infiltrate the terrorist cell? She looked like the same person.

  5. Favorite line was Frank to Jack, “We’re not going to Guam, are we?”

    It did seem that Ben was setting out to kill Penny, but it seems like more of a misdirection the more I think of it. I think that what the producers want us to believe. Of course, killing Penny would be a good way to get Desmond back on the island, avenging his wife’s death.

  6. The more I think about it, the more troubled I am that the two scenes showing Kate regaining consciousness in the lagoon are different. What’s up with that? It’s more than a continuity error, it would have had to have been written that way in the script. Cuse and Lindelof are nothing if not meticulous. But what can it mean? I haven’t the slightest clue. Maybe it’s nothing.

  7. You know, it doesn’t seem that Ben delivered on his promise for Ms. Hawking to show Sun evidence that Jin is still alive. I wonder if the whole thing was just a bluff

    I think the evidence was Jin’s wedding ring, and Ben lied about how Mrs. Hawking was the one with the evidence, when he had the ring with him the whole time. The purpose of this lie seems to have been to get Jack and Sun to the Lamp Post.

  8. A lot of people are assuming Ben either killed or tried to kill Penny. I think he might have just gone to talk to Desmond – he was clearly upset by the realization that Desmond knows some things he doesn’t (Eloise being Faraday’s mother, that his trip to the island was not an accident). Ben’s face would align nicely with Desmond’s likely reaction to his questions/possible accusations/possible suggestion to come with everyone else.

    There’s also been an assumption that Ray is Christian’s father, which if so, messes with so many theories around Christian, chiefly that he’s part of the island’s history. However, what if Ray is Jack’s mother’s father? No relation to Christian, no relation to Aaron. At the same time, surely his purpose was more than providing shoes and more Jack character building – if anything, that’s the biggest mystery of this episode for me.

  9. There’s also been an assumption that Ray is Christian’s father, which if so, messes with so many theories around Christian, chiefly that he’s part of the island’s history.

    Fair point. Personally, I’ve never been partial to the theory that Christian has a history with the island. He was a chief of medicine at a Los Angeles hospital, why would he be involved in all the island hoo-doo upto that point. Nothing we know about Christian’s personal history suggests DHARMA/Hanso/Other involvement (contra Mr. Paik or Charles Widmore, for example).

    I also happen to think that Ray is Chistian’s father, if only because of the vague family resemblance, plus the fact that it would seem less odd to have your son’s shoes than to have your son-in-law’s shoes (don’t ask why, just go with me on this).

  10. re Christian – it is entirely possible that his importance is just as Jack’s father, and that Jack himself is only important because he’s the main character who got himself Lost in a huge web of history and rivalries and intrigues. And that the show is about his character development, in the face of all this.

    I did note that Eloise seemed to have a soft spot for Jack, which could just be because she felt he was an innocent in all this.

    However, two things remain that would only indicate (I think!) that Christian has a greater role in this: his grandfathering of Aaron, who seems to be important, and his appearances before Locke and Michael – little to do with Jack – that would seem to say that he has some say in the action, or at least some interest.

    And yes it would be odd to have your son-in-law’s shoes, but it’s not odd to have your daughter send you things that she can’t bear to throw out.

  11. Oh and further – your link to Cabin Christian vs Suited Christian – I have a feeling that they are the same person, but in two different forms of apparition.

    Cabin Christian is an island spirit of some kind – a bodily manifestation of Jacob’s wishes, his own dead self, his own past on the island, or perhaps some purgatorial lifeform that hangs around only until his wrongs are righted.

    Suited Christian is quite simply in Jack’s head. He’s his conscience, his guilt, his own self. Suited Christian only appears to Jack.

  12. Regarding the opening and ending island sequences – I just thought they wanted to circle us back to where we started but edited it down a little so we didn’t have to re-watch the scene again in its entirety.

    I’ll have to watch again to see if there were glaring inconsistencies. I just thought it was to set us up to welcome Jin to the scene.

  13. Regarding the opening and ending island sequences – I just thought they wanted to circle us back to where we started but edited it down a little so we didn’t have to re-watch the scene again in its entirety.

    I thought that at first too, but when I re-watched it, the two scenes were clearly inconsistent. In both, we have a continuous shot of Kate from the moment she regains consciousness, and the dialog is completely different. (I’m not sure the inconsistencies really make any substantive difference, though, so maybe it is just an editing error.)

  14. Great episode. I rather liked the exposition bit at the beginning best. Favorite line?

    Jack: Is he lying?
    Ms. Hawking: Oh, probably.

    The delivery of the actress was fantastic. Reminded me of an old 60’s Disney film where there’s some witch in the midst of all these unbelievable things and just taking it all in stride.

    This USA Today article reviews the current state of Lost and 24 and calls them “the two best shows on TV.”

    Wha? This week’s 24 was a drastic improvement over the prior two weeks. But 24 is not remotely close to being the best show on TV. It’s not even remotely close to being as good as its first two seasons.

    All the stuff about “recreating as best you can the circumstances” of Oceanic 815 seems like superstitious hokum.

    Not if they are trying to deal with Jacob.

    I like the fact that Hurley bought all of the 78 open seats on the flight. A truly humanitarian thing to do, preventing innocent travelers from either death or condemnation to freaky island life.

    And Ben didn’t give a damn what happened to the other passengers which tells a lot about him.

  15. I bet we’ll find out that “Charlie” convinced Hurley to get on the flight to Guam with the guitar.

    “Claire” probably convinced Kate to give Aaron to his grandmother.

    It looks like Sayid has no idea what’s going on.

  16. A few thoughts I didn’t see brought up.

    The arab looking guy on the plane. Was that the co-conspirator that the CIA had Sayid infiltrate? I thought it was but wasn’t sure. Given the camera focus on him he’ll be important.

    I’m looking forward to the other flashbacks – especially next week’s Locke centric episode.

    If Ben got taken off the plane (and I’m not convinced he is) then does he convince the young Ben to act the way he does? I’m really intrigued as to what happens in the past.

    We don’t know that Jin and Locke were on different skip paths. Some of the paths that seemed innocuous to Locke and company probably were the period when Jin met the French.

    BTW – does everyone assume Kate gave Aaron to his grandmother?

  17. The arab looking guy on the plane. Was that the co-conspirator that the CIA had Sayid infiltrate? I thought it was but wasn’t sure. Given the camera focus on him he’ll be important.

    I don’t think so. I looked up the actor’s bio on IMDb (link in the post) and it doesn’t show him as having appeared on Lost previously. He seems to be a new character named Caesar. This suggests that some of the other Ajira passengers did, in fact, make it to the island.

  18. “Regarding the opening and ending island sequences – I just thought they wanted to circle us back to where we started but edited it down a little so we didn’t have to re-watch the scene again in its entirety.”

    I agree.

    We didn’t see Jack dive off the waterfall cliff in the second sequence. Doesn’t mean it didn’t happen.

  19. I don’t think it would make sense for Kate to give Aaron to Claire’s mother. She won’t even tell his half-uncle where he is, so why would she do such a turnaround on the grandmother?

    I think it’s more likely Aaron is with Sawyer’s ex-girlfriend and child, which might explain why she doesn’t want to tell Jack. She’s been freakish about keeping Sawyer’s secret to date (I’m assuming that’s what he whispered to her on the heli, and then her mysterious mission after rescue.

  20. Okay, I am new to the site (which I LOVE and my favorite place to come the morning after LOST). I am just now trying to understand all the theories and you guys are a BIG help…thanks!

    My question is why would Ben even have to be on the flight when he is able to jump from place to place anyway? Sorry, if I am missing something but something that does not make sense. Also, why does Jack come to Kate on the plane and say the whole part about all of them being on the same flight?!?!?! That does not make sense since he has known all along that ALL of them have to go back.

    Loved the theory about Penny and Ben making good on his promise. I hope it did not happen but a good thought.

    Yes, Ben is a VERY bad man!
    Thanks again everyone!!!

  21. Jenny –

    Good call on Kate giving Aaron to Cassidy. A lot of people including me, were expecting Sawyer’s whisper to Kate to pay off with Cassidy. Wasn’t she making some phone calls/visits last season which made Jack jealous? I don’t think that was explained.

    But if she has been in regular contact with her for awhile, it would seem more likely that she could trust Aaron to her rather than Aaron’s grandmother who had no clue what was going on.

    The Oceanic 6 may have made it back to the island (or at least some have so far) but there’s still a lot of mainland story to be told. (Penny better be okay!)

  22. Jane, welcome! Glad to have you here.

    My question is why would Ben even have to be on the flight when he is able to jump from place to place anyway?

    I’m not sure I understand the question. The only time I can think of Ben jumping from place to place (and through time) was when he turned the Frozen Donkey Wheel on the island and ended up in Tunisia. And he didn’t seem to have any control over where or when he ended up. I don’t think Ben has any special traveling powers.

  23. I’m with Greg about the strange inconsistency in those two scenes. To me it was clearly different, and looked obvious enough to be intentional. I have no idea why. But further support: The scene where Eloise sees Ben and his group walk into the Church. She says something like “Well, they’ll have to do for now.” But in the closing scene of last episode, it was different dialogue. Same meaning, but different words. I think it was more like, “Well, I suppose they’ll have to do.” Go back and re-watch- the dialogue is different. Why?

    One other very strange little thing to notice. I haven’t seen anyone bring this up yet anywhere, but the scene where Jack is in his kitchen and he picks up the phone and it’s Ben calling from that payphone, look at Jack’s arm- the one not holding the phone. The inside of the arm is completely scabbed over, like he’d been dragged somewhere or something. This was so weird to notice, and I couldn’t make any meaning of it at all, but it would have to mean something, wouldn’t it? Someone go back and look just to make sure I’m not crazy.

  24. As much as I’d love to do a frame-by-frame comparison of the two beginning and end scenes ;-), I bet someone else will do it on one of the forums. Maybe Lostpedia will post something.

    ryanbrettbell –

    I think you are talking about Jack’s inner arm tattoos, which have a lot of red in them.

  25. I think you are talking about Jack’s inner arm tattoos, which have a lot of red in them.

    I think this is probably right.

    Hey, you know what we need? More episodes about how Jack got his tattoos!

    (kidding.)

  26. I’m with you, BTD Greg – I was very pleasantly surprised that an episode focusing only on the O6 could be so good! Sawyer wasn’t even around to deliver the best lines!

    Speaking of which, I agree with Tim J that Frank’s line was one of them. Two others were delivered by Ben: “My mother taught me.” and “Who cares?”

    I agree on the many parallels between passengers on flights 316 and 815. Here’s an idea for another one:

    What if Kate is pregnant by Jack? Not from the night before the flight, but from earlier (I don’t recall how long they’ve been apart). If she just found out, that might have been part of her motivation to get back with Jack and even go to the island with him. Also she would be the pregnant 316 passenger, paralleling Claire. Finally, the child would be another grandchild for Christian.

    Then again, she probably expects to finally see Sawyer again also. Good grief. Thoughts?

  27. If I were Hurley, and I knew I was coming back to the island to stay, I know what I’d put in the (hopefully watertight!) guitar case – my iPod with a solar-powered battery recharger. Maybe some shoes. =)

  28. Jane, Ben was told he wasn’t supposed to return to the island. I suspect we’ll see some play on that. I had the impression that Widmore can’t go back either.

    I think Jack and Kate broke up more than 9 months earlier.

    BTW – anyone know the name of that Church? I’m pretty sure it’s a famous Methodist church in Hawaii. (The actual church, not what it is supposed to be on the show) I could have sworn they toured in on This Old House when they did that Hawaiian build.

  29. I’d be very surprised if Kate gives Aaron to Sawyer’s ex. Plus they introduced the grandmother as being in LA. That’s a fair bit of foreshadowing there. And the writers have been pretty good about foreshadowing big reveals.

  30. I’m guessing Aaron ended up in the hands of someone dangerous. That would explain Kate’s guilt and fulfill the prophecy.

    I’m guess the plane didn’t crash. I think the plane happened to be flying over the island when it went through a time skip. I think Jack, Kate, Hurley, etc. are kind of considered part of the island. So when the island skipped time, all of a sudden the O5 were up in the air without a plane. Just my guess.

    BTD, I’m guessing it wasn’t a continuity error at the lagoon, but a time saving measure. They do this often when replaying a scene.

    I’m happy to have Frank back in my life, but I agree – bring back the beard.

    I’m going to guess that Hurley had a visitation that inspired his change of heart. Probably from Charlie. Sayid might have had the same thing. From Shannon maybe?

    After all this Christ/Thomas talk plus the note, I think its clear we will see Locke walking around again soon.

    Time skipping is not a deus ex machina if the island is doing it for a purpose. Nobody ever said the time skipping was random and the island has CONSTANTLY put people in the perfect position to see something and run into someone even before the time skipping.

    Aren’t the O6 pseudo celebs? If I saw 5 of them on my plane, I think I’d ask off.

  31. Clark –

    You may be right but what makes me think Jenny may be on to something was the way Kate made Jack promise to never ask her again. I only recall being like that when she was thought to be keeping Sawyer’s secret.

  32. OK, silly question. I thought Hurley bought up all the other seats on the flight so that other people wouldn’t die/crash? But while there were open seats in the front section, the rear section was full of non-Losties. Did Hurley simply buy up all the seats in the front section? And what good would that do?

  33. I guess I just totally misread the scene between Locke and Christian at the end of the last episode, but I thought the time shifts were happening because the donkey wheel had been pushed off its axis. When Locked turned it, I kind of assumed he was righting its alignment, which would stop the flashes.

    Am I the only one who came to this conclusion?

  34. Brian, yes, for the random time jumps it was the wheel. But for bringing the original flight and the losties clearly the island had a motive.

  35. But the argument made by Locke and other island supporters was that the Oceanic Six were supposed to get back on the Island for the Island to “correct” itself. If all that had to happen for the island to stop skipping was for the wheel to be put back on its axis, what did that have to do with the Oceanic Six?

  36. What proof do we have that the skipping has stopped? On the plane we had the white flash with the booster engine type sound that goes with skipping. Other than that, we’ve haven’t been on the island besides the short time after 5 of the 6 returned, and when they did return, Jin was wear a Dharma jumpsuit, so who knows what’s going on there with time and space.

  37. What proof do we have that the skipping has stopped?

    I don’t think we have any proof at all. I think this is just an assumption that people are making.

    Let’s look at what we do know:

    * When Ben turned the FDW at the end of season 4, the island and/or the Left Behinders began skipping through time

    * Also when Ben turned the FDW, the island apparently disappeared–Ben “moved the island,” and the folks in the chopper saw it vanish.

    * Locke (aka Jeremy Bentham) visits (at least) Walt, Kate and Jack (and possibly Sayid and Hurley) trying to convince them to return to the island and telling them it was because they left that bad things happened to the people who stayed.

    * Richard Alpert told Locke, “The only way to save the island John is to get your people back here, the ones who left.” He doesn’t say anything about saving the Left Behinders or stopping the time skipping.

    * Locke turned the FDW (some are saying in the opposite direction that Ben turned it–but, in a weird paradox, at a point in the island’s history that far predated the time in which Ben turned it) and set it back on its access, probably causing him to be transported off the island. We don’t yet know what effect this had.

    I’m guessing this stuff will become a little bit more clear next week, or at least in the next couple of weeks.

    By the way, reviewing this, I realized that my “Temple” theory–i.e., that it was only the people in the Temple who were spared from the time-skipping–doesn’t hold up. Locke, Alpert and a group of hostiles were together in the jungle when Ben first turned the FDW, and only Locke skips through time. So I’m back to being perplexed about that whole issue.

  38. That was really weird when Ms. Hawking actually started explaining something in a sustained fashion. I was sitting there in stunned disbelief. Lost? Explain something? What is the world coming to.

    The idea that you can figure out where the island will likely be provides a mechanism for people knowing beforehand that 815 was going to fly over the island. This could help explain why Abaddon told Locke to go on walkabout.

    As to Jin in a DHARMA car and outfit, it did seem to suggest he’s been in that time for awhile in order to become part of DHARMA. Otherwise I would be of the opinion that everyone is still skipping through time, but that is the best reason I can think of to suppose they got stuck somewhere. Thing is, if they got stuck where they were when Locke fixed the wheel, wasn’t that way back in time from before there was a well?

  39. i doubt that desmond and penny sailed from UK. hawking said they had 70 hours to get back, and it takes a lot longer than that to sail from uk->LA

  40. i doubt that desmond and penny sailed from UK. hawking said they had 70 hours to get back, and it takes a lot longer than that to sail from uk->LA

    Ooh, good point.

  41. It seems that if the skipping has stopped, Jin and the Islanders must have experienced the passage of roughly three years in the pre-Orchid Station era before Jin discovers Jack, Kate, and Hurley on the Island. We’re probably now pretty close to the point in time where we started the season, with Faraday as a Dharma miner. I wonder if Faraday et. al. helped Dharma figure out where to build the Orchid.

  42. #29 – jack and kate had definitely been broken up for some time, but weren’t they, ah, intimate the night before the flight?

    my best guess is that claire appeared to kate. i can’t imagine her just handing aaron over to anyone other than claire, so i’m guessing there was a manifestation of some sort?

    how did sun just walk away from ji yeon so easily? does she think she’ll go pick up jin and come back? does she really believe she’ll leave her daughter behind forever? does she just know that she has to go back, but can’t take the baby? so bizarre.

    i just started watching “lost” a month ago. had a new baby and was on bedrest, so a lovely friend loaned me the dvd’s. i’m officially caught up and am loving being able to actual read the recaps now.

  43. The scene where Ben, Sun, Jack, and Desmond enter the church above the Lamp Post also plays slightly differently in this episode versus the previous one.

    Last week, Ben said, “Hello, Eloise,” and Mrs. Hawking lit a candle, turned around, and replied, “Hello, Benjamin” before saying, “I thought I said all of them.” He said, “This is all I could get on short notice” and she sighed and replied, “Well, I suppose it’ll have to do for now. Alright. Let’s get started.”

    This week, Mrs. Hawking is lighting a candle, turns around as the door opens and then the first line is “I thought I said all of them” without the greetings. Also, her reply to his line, “This is all I could get on short notice” is, “Guess it’ll have to do for now. Alright. Let’s get started.”

    Probably insignificant differences. Last week it was drawn out with more pauses and suspenseful music.

  44. Last night on the rebroadcast pop-up version of this episode, I noticed that they didn’t comment on Ben saying that his mother taught him to read. Kudos to the Kulturblog folks for catching that one.

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