LOST: “The Little Prince”

This was a Kate-and-Aaron-centric episode. Sort of. Both the off-island and on-island plots are progressing.

Spoilers from tonight’s episode, and a bunch of other stuff, after the break.

Links and miscellanea:

  • Now Nestor Carbonell himself (Richard Alpert) has confirmed that he does not wear eyeliner. Hopefully this will put this pressing issue to rest.
  • Evangeline Lilly claims in this interview that she finds time travel confusing. Yeah, me too.
  • This TV critic complains that Lost has made TV too complicated. That’s a bad thing? Personally, I love that Lost has brought complexity to prime time. You won’t find me pining for the halcyon days of “Murder, She Wrote” and “Three’s Company.”
  • I like this approach much better: “I’m not going to even try to pretend that I understand everything that is going on or can remember all the tiny clues from seasons past that tie everything together. I’m simply not smart nor geeky enough. But I can still appreciate and enjoy the complexity of the show. And wherever, and whenever it decides to go, I am definitely along for the ride.” Sometimes I do like to pretend, though. And I probably am geeky enough.
  • Then again, I’m probably not half as geeky as the members of Hoo’s Lost, the University of Virginia’s official Lost fanclub.
  • More ratings wonkishness can be found here, if you like that sort of thing.

Observations and speculations:

  • Here’s a theory I’m working on that may help explain what’s happening this season: Do you ever wonder why some people on the island are skipping through time, but others are apparently not? We know that there are essentially three types of Left Behinders traveling through time: Juliet (a former Other, recruited by Ben and Richard Alpert), the trio of Miles, Charlotte and Faraday (formerly of the freighter), and Sawyer, Locke and the other Oceanic 815 survivors—heck, even Vincent the labrador is skipping through time. However, there are additional people (Richard Alpert, the remaining Others—including, presumably, Cindy the stewardess and the two Tailee children kidnapped by the Others while they were under Ana Lucia’s care) who do not seem to be skipping through time. How come? It can’t relate to how the people arrived on the island because each of these three groups arrived separately. Even the Others (at least, according to Ben) were mostly recruited and were not born there. My theory is that they were shielded by the effects of the Frozen Donkey Wheel because they had taken sanctuary in The Temple. Remember the Temple? I can’t blame you if you don’t; we don’t know much about it yet. We know that the Others were headed there at the end of season 3 when Ben decided to try to talk Jack out of making contact with the Others. We also know that Ben tried to send Alex there right before she was killed. At the time, Ben referred to it as one of the only safe places left on the island. At some point, I think we’ll learn more about the Temple, but for now, I’m hypothesizing that it’s a place where someone can be protected against the island’s time-and-space-jumping eccentricities.
  • The episode’s title, of course, takes its name from the novel written by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry. (He wrote it while living on an island, incidentally. And, of course, he was French, like the members of Rousseau’s research team.) Although the book is immensely popular, I’ve never read it. Wiki has this interesting note, though:

    In The Little Prince, Saint-Exupéry talks about being marooned in the desert in a damaged aircraft. Without doubt, this account was drawn from his own experience in the Sahara. He also writes about this ordeal, in detail, in his book Wind, Sand and Stars.

    On December 30, 1935 at 14:45, after an 18 hour and 36 minute flight, Saint-Exupéry, along with his navigator André Prévot, crashed in the Libyan Sahara desert en route to Saigon. They were attempting to fly from Paris to Saigon faster than anyone before them ever had; and all for a prize of 150,000 francs. Their plane was a Caudron C-600 Simoun n° 7042 (serial F-ANRY). Supposedly, the crash site is located in the Wadi Natrum. Both of them had survived the crash, but they were then faced with rapid dehydration in the Sahara. Their maps were primitive and ambiguous. Lost in the desert with a few grapes, a single orange, and some wine, the duo had only one day’s worth of liquids. After that day, they had nothing. Both men began to see mirages, which were quickly followed by more vivid hallucinations. Sometime between the second and the third day, the two were so dehydrated that they stopped sweating altogether. Finally, on the fourth day, a Bedouin on a camel discovered them and administered native dehydration treatment that saved Saint-Exupéry and Prévot’s lives.

    Interesting. A plane crash, marooned, lost, I’m seeing a pattern here. Also, remember that the island is somehow linked to the Sahara—it’s where Ben landed after turning the Frozen Donkey Wheel, and it’s also were Charlotte discovered a polar bear with a DHARMA collar.

  • Presumably, Aaron is the little prince. Maybe someone who’s read the book can tell me the significance of that.
  • So Kate came up with the idea to claim Aaron as her own. I guess she didn’t want to turn him over to strangers. Remember the Malkin the psychic’s admonition to Claire that “You mustn’t allow another to raise your baby” way back in season 1? I wonder if Claire ever shared this with Kate. Probably not. In part, it was selfish, based on her feeling that she couldn’t lose another person close to her.
  • Someone is giving Sun intell—most likely Widmore’s people—intel on Ben’s whereabouts and his movements. The folder Sun looks at in the hotel room is on letterhead for “Surveillance Data Investigations, Inc.,” suggesting a private investigation firm. Some interesting tidbit from the surveillance report:

    Tuesday morning: “Except for one trip to the mailbox, subject never left on (sic) 35 Sundigue Drive, a single-story, wood frame home painted green and yellow. Three times, when subject had not passed a visible window for thirty minutes, subject answered the telephone and replied that Lee Chin did not live there.”

    This basic information is repeated for other days, then

    Wednesday morning: “Except for three trips to the mailbox, subject never left 103 Pinecrest Drive, when subject had not passed a visible window for thirty minutes, subject answered the telephone and replied that Lee Chin was dead, a victim of suicide.”

    and

    Wednesday afternoon: “Except for seven trips to the mailbox, subject never left 103 Pinecrest Drive, when subject had not passed a visible window for thirty minutes, subject answered the telephone, claimed that I was Melissa f***king (sic) with her and demanded to know when I mailed her the prints.”

    and finally

    Wednesday Evening: “Subject came out of the house at 8:15 am, set up a camping chair next to the mailbox and preceded to pace the front yard until the mail truck arrived at 12:02 p.m. Subject grabbed mail from letter carrier and ran into the house. Photographs are presented in attachment A. Attachment A is … public pending legal clearance.”

    On the final page, it says

    Was unable to locate subject. After determining that subject’s car was still parked in front, asked the clerk behind the counter if my sister had been in today, describing the subject. Clerk said she had and that she bought three cans of spray paint, one box of rubber gloves, and one tack hammer, paying in cash before leaving by the rear door. Clerk didn’t remember colors of paint purchased. I checked the aisle and discovered fully stocked shelves with empty spaces in the rows containing the colors black, green and red although I cannot positively confirm that the cans were stocked as indicated. I asked the store clerk if the register captured the part number of items purchased, but he said he hadn’t scanned the cans of spray paint since he knew the price. I left the store by teh rear door and checked the area by foot, but was unable to locate subject.

    I returned to the store and again questioned the clerk. Clerk reported that subject used store phonebook to look up number of Oxford City Cab, then remained at counter and used her cell phone to have cab pick her up at Abner’s Restaurant, 438 S Lamar, and take her to animal clinic of Oxford, 2000 Harris Drive.

    Drove various routes to animal clinic but did not sight subject. Visited animal clinic, receptionist stated that she had not seen subject. Returned to Ace hardware to find subject’s car had gone. I called client for instructions and was told to establish surveillance at subjects home. The client said she would call me if the subject was sighted at the Yoknapatawpha County Conference Center.

    Isn’t HD great? On the other hand, if I didn’t have HD, I wouldn’t be up in the middle of the night transcribing a TV show prop. I don’t know if this text has anything to do with the story at all. According to what is written, the subject of the surveillance is a woman, but one would expect it to have been Ben. The photos don’t relate to the report at all, but show Jack and Ben outside the Hoffs/Drawler Funeral Home (the site of Locke’s funeral). Also, the reference to Yoknapatawpha County (the fictional county in Mississippi of many of William Faulkner’s novels) is an indication that the report might be dummied up and not relate at all to the story. Perhaps, if the writers are truly sadistic, they purposely created this red herring of a report just so that fans would overanalyze it. Mission accomplished, I guess.

  • Sun also receives a box of Godiva chocolates, the kind with a handgun on the bottom layer.
  • Faraday’s explanation for the nosebleeds is interesting. Apparently, traveling through time can cause a kind of brain-hemorrhaging vertigo related to the brain’s “internal clock.” Even more interesting is his hypothesis later in the episode that the effects might be more severe depending on the duration of time someone spent on the island. First we see Charlotte affected, then Miles, then Juliet. We know Juliet lived on the island for around three years before Oceanic 815 crashed. We also know that Charlotte lived on the island during her childhood, probably for several years. Miles, it seems, lived on the island for years but does not remember it. This is further evidence that Miles might be the baby that Dr. Chang/Marvin Candle lifted out of the crib in the season premier.
  • Ben’s lawyer, Mr. Norton, is pretty efficient. I suppose you would expect that. It also makes sense that Ben was behind putting the scare in Kate. Ben’s m.o. has always been to use whatever a person cares most about to manipulate them (think Michael and WAAALT!), and what Kate cares most about at this particular moment is Aaron. He probably thought that scaring Kate might motivate her to flee to the one place were lawyers and custody battles could never find them—the island.
  • Of course, visiting Claire’s mother appears to have been an almost successful feint to throw Kate off. And he would have gotten away with it too, if not for that meddling Jack.
  • Locke is beginning to formulate a plan: get to the Orchid Station, decend to the bottom and try to get himself off the island the same way Ben exited. Then locate the Oceanic Six and convince them to come back. It’s a pretty rudimentary scheme at this point, but Locke’s moving it forward.
  • Really nice easter egg: Dave—Hurley’s imaginary friend— is one of Hurley’s fellow inmates in LA County lockup. A guard leads him in a door while Hurley is talking on the phone to Jack. Awesome.
  • It’s interesting that this episode is the second time (that we know of) that people have tried to tranquilize, but not kill, Sayid. Someone is very interested in taking Sayid alive, and incapacitated. Someone who was either also coming after Kate, or wanted Sayid and Jack to think that Kate was behind the attack. Lucky for Sayid, he’s half ninja.
  • Numbers sighting: 42 Panorama Crest, Kate’s address.
  • I enjoyed the shoutouts to the end of season 1: the shaft of light from the hatch and Claire giving birth to Aaron in the jungle. I’m a bit flummoxed by Sawyer watching the birth scene, though. Could he have interacted with Kate and Claire? Could he interact with his past self? Meh, time travel. What’s it all mean?
  • Locke, true to character, is approaching time travel with a resolved fatalism. Unlike Sawyer, who is disturbed by the experience, Locke has no wish to change the past, but understands that the present cannot exist without the events that got him where is now.
  • When the Left Behinds finally arrive back at the beach, they arrive at some time in the future. The camp has been ransacked (they even took Vincent!), and there are a couple of long pontoon boats are on the beach. One of the boats has a water bottle labeled with the logo of Ajira Airways, another fictional airlines. Here are some promotional videos created for Ajira Airways:

    Here’s the “official” website (“Get lost in the world with groundbreaking promotions like Destination: Destiny that keeps your flight destination a mystery until you get there. We’re changing the way people think about travel – this isn’t vacation, this is your life… escaped. Let us deliver your destination by revealing your destiny.” Ha.).
  • If the Left Behinders were smarter, they would have taken both boats with them on their sea journey to the Orchid Station.
  • So who are the Ajira pontoon boat people? Other others? No one seems to claim them.
  • Claire’s mother thinks she’s dead. And, uh, so do I. I guess.
  • Ben and Sayid are driving around in a “Canton-Rainier” carpet cleaning van. My guess is that this is an anagram for “reincarnation.” I think this is the same van that Locke’s corpse was driven around in. This is strong support for the theory that Locke will be brought back to life.
  • Updated to add a new theory: Reincarnation is a key. Reincarnation explains the Others’ obsession with babies born on the island, and Richard Alpert’s fascination with Locke. Think about it, Alex and Aaron were both born on the island. Ben was so obsessed with Alex that he stole her from Danielle and raised her as his own. The Others sent Ethan to kidnap Claire, and were contemplating cutting her baby out of her at the Staff Station even if it killed Claire. The Others were also desperately trying to solve the problem of pregnant women dying on the island, which, let’s face it, is a bad problem in and of itself, but also may be preventing some reincarnated being from being born on the island. And then there’s the Locke/Jacob/Alpert relationship. We don’t know much about Jacob, but all signs point to some sort of disembodied spiritual force. He’s sort of like the Others’ version of the Dalai Lama (only malignant). The test that Richard Alpert gives to Young Locke is very similar to the test that’s given to children who are possible incarnations of the the Dalai Lama. My newest theory is that the Others are trying to watch for signs of Jacob’s reincarnation.

  • As soon as the Left Behinders saw that the remnants of the wreckage included French writing, I immediately thought of Rousseau and her research team. In fact, I thought the final reveal dragged a bit. (Then again, maybe it wasn’t so obvious to more casual viewers—assuming any of them still watch.) It was only a matter of time before this story popped up in the time flashes. I didn’t expect that they would be the ones who rescued Jin, floating on a raft in the ocean.
  • Speaking of Jin, he’s got to be just sick and tired of being shipwrecked off the coast of Lost island. Right?

I liked this one. It wasn’t as great as last week’s Desmond episode, but in reviewing it for this post, there was a lot of great stuff packed into it. The story is moving at a brisk pace, and questions are being answered.

Please share your pet theories and observations in the comments below.

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62 thoughts on “LOST: “The Little Prince”

  1. Another excellent write-up. Are you proposing that one must be inside the temple just in the moment the Frozen Donkey Wheel is turned, or must remain inside the temple until the skipping stops? You must mean the former, because Locke meets up with Richard et al after he leaves the Orchid.

    An alternate theory, not necessarily contradictory, is that becoming an Other (in whatever process that entails) makes one immune. This ‘blessing,’ however, can be revoked: remember that Juliet was “marked” and now she’s skipping.

    Along with Locke’s eventual reincarnation, I expect we’ll see some more Others raised; some of them just didn’t seem too worried about death. And I like this idea because it gives me hope that we’ll see Mikhail again.

  2. btw, what kind of gun is light-weight enough that it can be concealed in a box of chocolate? Or maybe I should be asking about very heavy chocolates? Clark, any help here?

  3. I love your write-ups SOO much. Thanks for doing this. It makes die-hard fans like me feel like I’m not alone.

    I like the idea that the temple is what is keeping the others safe from the time traveling. Ben called it a “sanctuary” to Alex, so that would make a lot of sense — truly a sanctuary.

  4. I feel that time travel is becoming their deus ex machina though. It’s nice, isn’t it that the flashes of time travel happen to conveniently transport them to just the right spots.

    I’m glad we can see more of the Rousseau story. Note that she is pregnant. Ironic for Ben to tell Kate that Aaron is not her kid when Alex was not HIS kid either…

    Ben is evil. Previous episodes sealed it in cement for me, but today, it sealed it in diamond platinum iron.

    Remember, Ben claims that the reason for the island skipping on the turntable is that Jack and the others left the island. But is this really true? Who turned the donkey wheel? It wasn’t Jack and the others. It was Ben! The reason for the island skipping is Ben! Poor Locke, continues to be bamboozled by Ben.

    I really wasn’t that impressed with this episode. I hope Sun doesn’t chicken out. Put a bullet in the guy, Sun.

    Finally, I don’t think “The Little Prince” really described Aaron. At least, the title seemed to indicate more than the episode let on. We had no revelations in this episode that really added anything about Aaron that we didn’t already know.

  5. Just discovered this blog last week – excellent!

    I think the Little Prince might actually be Ben, or possibly Locke.

    Still trying to figure out why Ben and Ellie want the O6 back on the island so bad. I’m wondering if they really only want Aaron, and Ben is using several strategies: steal Aaron from Kate, scare Kate into willingly coming, get Jack to persuade her, get everyone else on board so she has no choice. I wonder if at some point he will say “fine, Hurley and Sun can stay here.” Otherwise, why don’t they want Walt too?

    Good thing Desmond is about to show up with his boat, no?

  6. Jenny, welcome! I’m glad you found your way to our humble little blog.

    Still trying to figure out why Ben and Ellie want the O6 back on the island so bad. I’m wondering if they really only want Aaron, and Ben is using several strategies: steal Aaron from Kate, scare Kate into willingly coming, get Jack to persuade her, get everyone else on board so she has no choice. I wonder if at some point he will say “fine, Hurley and Sun can stay here.” Otherwise, why don’t they want Walt too?

    You may be onto something. Think about this: Aaron was the last successful live birth on the island since–what?–Alex? And we know how obsessed Ben was with Alex. The Others have been obsessed with Aaron for a long time, going way back to when they kidnapped Claire and appeared willing to kill Claire to take her baby from her.

  7. The idea of Ben being the Prince is intriguing. It has been a long time, but my memory of the Little Prince is that he sacrificed to take care of one flower–it was his only occupation. Ben seems like he will do anything for the island–he doesn’t really care about people dying–he will kill them for the island.

  8. Another numbers sighting: Ben told Jack to get Kate and meet at the Long Beach marina, slip 23.

    Bésixdouze (B612) is the name of the asteroid the Little Prince is from, and it was on whatever Locke kicked over from Rousseau’s crew’s wreckage.

    Ooh, I like the theory about the Temple. I think you’re on to something.

  9. You really rock. I love this write up. Thanks for going through all this detail for the slower viewers! 😉

  10. Ben seems like he will do anything for the island–he doesn’t really care about people dying–he will kill them for the island.

    Locke made a similar comment to Sawyer–that he’d do what ever it takes to bring the others back, even if it kills him.

  11. What’s interesting about the time travel is that we are seeing the history of the island in full. Who wants to bet that next week we’ll be seeing how the Black Rock got there?

  12. What’s interesting about the time travel is that we are seeing the history of the island in full. Who wants to bet that next week we’ll be seeing how the Black Rock got there?

    Yes, isn’t it nice that the island is so graciously transporting the Left Behinders only to times and places of significance, and we don’t have any wandering through the jungle on a day when Jacob wrote in his diary, “Nothing much happened today. Slight wind from the northwest. At another mango, then went to bed early”?

    Instead it’s like we’re seeing the island’s greatest hits.

  13. Okay, new theory time: Reincarnation is a huge key.

    Reincarnation explains the Others’ obsession with babies born on the island, and Richard Alpert’s fascination with Locke. Think about it, Alex and Aaron were both born on the island. Ben was so obsessed with Alex that he stole her from Danielle and raised her as his own. The Others sent Ethan to kidnap Claire, and were contemplating cutting her baby out of her at the Staff Station even if it killed Claire. The Others were also desperately trying to solve the problem of pregnant women dying on the island, which, let’s face it, is a bad problem in and of itself, but also may be preventing some reincarnated being from being born on the island.

    And then there’s the Locke/Jacob/Alpert relationship. We don’t know much about Jacob, but all signs point to some sort of disembodied spiritual force. He’s sort of like the Others’ version of the Dalai Lama (only malignant). The test that Richard Alpert gives to Young Locke is very similar to the test that’s given to children who are possible incarnations of the the Dalai Lama.

    My newest theory is that the Others are trying to watch for signs of Jacob’s reincarnation.

  14. Aaron’s significance goes way beyond being one of the few children born on the island in recent years.

    He’s the grandson of Christian Shepherd, who like Locke is apparently about to do, came to the island in a coffin. And then mysteriously seemed to be somewhat alive again …

    I think Christian Shepherd and therefore Aaron is a descendant of the survivors of the Black Rock, as is Charles Widmore (thus his interest in it’s history – he’s trying to prove his right), which in turn makes Charlie Hume very important too.

    Aaron is one of the rightful heirs to the island, and Ben knows it. He wants him back there for one of three reasons I can think of: 1. because Ben still loves the island and wants to do what’s right 2. because Ben would rather have the Shepherd faction back on the island than the Widmores or 3. because Ben would rather have anyone that Locke and Richard controlling the island, so he wants to trump them with someone who has more right than they do.

  15. We posted at the same time – I agree with you and further think that Jacob is the (deceased) patriarch of the island, Richard is some sort of lieutenant or keeper (thus he doesn’t age, it’s a job, not a life), and Christian and Charles are his sons/descendants. (As are Jack, Aaron, Penny, Charlie jr, and quite possibly Charlotte and Daniel as well).

    Ben and Locke are mere temps in island leadership (and possible evidence of Richard overstepping his bounds by putting his own choices in place), as history waits for the return of the prodigal sons, or their heirs.

  16. Great write-up as always (I’ve been lurking since you did them @ BTD).

    Quick question unrelated to this week’s action: have we seen what happened to Rose and Bernard?

  17. Quick question unrelated to this week’s action: have we seen what happened to Rose and Bernard?

    No. The Left Behinders expected them to be back at the beach camp. I think maybe they were driven off or captured when the Ajira pontoon people came on shore and trashed the camp. Or they are somewhere else entirely.

  18. Oh I love Jenny’s observation that Christian and Locke are both coming (or came) to the island in a coffin.

  19. As always, thanks for the great summary and links.

    I’m still not convinced that Ben is evil but he just has no hesitation in resorting to brutal tactics when the Island is concerned. Locke on the other hand seems to not be there and is even self-sacrificing in contrast.

    While Aaron is likely still very important, I don’t think he’s everything. Richard Alpert told Locke in Season 3 that it was Ben who was obsessed with figuring out the childbirth issues (I suspect because of something that happened to him personally, perhaps with Annie).

    My impression from Richard was that he (and presumably the rest of the Others) wanted to move on. Suggesting they wanted a new leader such as Locke.

    At least that’s what I remember.

  20. Ohh! In response to #17: Maybe my theory from a couple weeks back about the “him” in ghostly warnings post Oceanic Six return not being Aaron (and anyway, it turns out it’s not an original theory; Jeff Jensen at EW thinks “him” is Christian Shephard) should be about Jacob instead of Locke. Before we knew Jacob’s name, he was always the mysterious “him.” “Raise him” and “bring him back” could be other ways of saying, “reincarnate him.”

  21. David that makes a great deal of sense – Ben being the one obsessed with the childbirth issue, not Richard – and let’s remember that Ben’s own mother died giving birth to him.

    I do agree that Richard is the one who had had enough of Ben – who he chose in the first place – and is trying to replace him with Locke, which ain’t going so well.

  22. I just found this blog on a search for “sundigue drive” from the surveillance report. Excellent stuff here.

    Since you all clearly follow the show with the same vigor I do, have you recently had one of those “duh” moments where something so obvious hits you that you can’t believe you didn’t think it before? I just had one of those with Jack’s Dad’s name… Christian Shephard! Anyone know of any Christian shephards? Without getting into all of the “begat” lingo, Christian -> Claire -> Aaron (Moses’ brother in the Old Testament… Aaron = The first high priest).

  23. I liked this episode but the fact it was Ben behind the Aaron lawsuit was kind of obvious from the beginning. The only thing that made it semi-interesting was the small chance it was Widmore.

    Likewise the ending with Rousseau was pretty obvious from early on. But it’s nice to see Jin survived even if it seems implausible. (The Island healing people again?)

    There’s a movie version of the Little Prince with Gene Wilder as the devil character that is quite good. (Although I’ve not seen it in ages – who knows my view might be different now) BTW – I think Locke is the little prince.

    Does Jack’s team actually know Claire is dead? I can’t recall how Locke described things.

    Brian, it looked like a 9mm Glock with an odd silvered slide rather than the typical black one. I have a .40S&W Glock that I love even though it’s been ages since I had time to go shooting. I didn’t pause the shot though so that’s just my memory although at the time I remember being curious about it. There are a few other guns that look similar though. In a compact model (say the Glock 26) it could easily fit in a box like that.

    Deus ex machina isn’t that bad when clearly the island itself is the deus. (See Forgotten Planet for an example of this)

    Meems, I agree that if the island can “resurrect” people (and it’s not clear Jack’s dad is so resurrected yet) that Locke will live again. It’ll be interesting to know if that is what happened to Jin or if he merely survived.

  24. Usually for something to fit the bill for Deus ex Machina it has to easily resolve things. The time travel is actually making things worse now that Charlotte, Juliet, and Miles are all bleeding out their nose.

    Personally, I think it’s a brilliant conceit on the part of the writers to fill in gaps in the timeline.

  25. Yeah, it’s not a bad deus ex machina if it’s not being used as a lazy way out of a predicament. Clearly time travel is central to the story. (And it was kind of obvious from the beginning with the flashbacks that this would be an element on such a mysterious island)

  26. Clark: “Does Jack’s team actually know Claire is dead? I can’t recall how Locke described things.”

    No, I don’t think so. In fact, I think Jack and Kate assume that Claire is still alive. Sawyer was the last one of the survivors to see her before Jack and Kate left, and he just said that she walked off in the middle of the night and left her baby behind. I don’t think Locke spoke to Jack and Kate after seeing Christian and Claire in Jacob’s ghost shack, but I could be wrong.

  27. Clark: I was more concerned about the weight of a handgun + ammo. “Oh, what’s in this box? Just some very heavy chocolates….”

    BTD Greg: any thoughts on Juliet being marked making her susceptible to time-skipping?

    Jenny: really cool observation about the coffin.

  28. BTD Greg: any thoughts on Juliet being marked making her susceptible to time-skipping?

    It’s a decent theory. We’ve never learned much about what Juliet’s mark was supposed to mean. At some point we could learn that it has significance that we didn’t know about earlier.

    But I’m sticking with my Temple theory until proven wrong.

  29. I like the Temple theory too, but I can’t figure out why at the first flash, Locke time traveled but the Others didn’t. Either they weren’t in the Temple so they should’ve traveled, or they were (it was sort of a natural temple perhaps), and then Locke shouldn’t have moved. Sigh, I guess we’ll know soon enough.

    I must own up also that from the first time the idea started being talked about among fans, I’ve been resisting the idea of time travel or space travel or moving the island. I’m all for psychic and spiritual stuff, but I don’t really like sci-fi.

    Now that I must accept it though, I’m still not quite ready to embrace immortals (Richard) or reincarnations (take your pick). I’d like to think that the island allows the dead – at least certain dead people – to live on in a new way, and continue to interact with some of the living. I’m hoping that the Claire-Christian in the Cabin scene was the first real evidence that that can happen with the right combination of people (beings?).

  30. Does Jin dispel the “Temple as a Sanctuary” theory?
    He is obviously skipping through time — as he was picked up by Rousseau and her crew back in the 70’s, but he is most certainly not in the Temple when Ben turned the frozen donkey wheel…
    I assume he must have been in the radius…

  31. The Temple Theory states that you had to be in the Temple at the time that Ben turned the Frozen Donkey Wheel and set the time skipping in motion, or else you are skipping through time.

    The theory presumes that the Others were in the Temple, so no time skipping for them.

    Jin was not in the Temple* so he’s skipping through time. Juliet, Sawyer, Locke, Faraday, Charlotte, Miles, Redshirts, et al., were not in the Temple, so they are also time skipping.

    All clear now?

    *And Jin he was somehow blasted into the radius of the island, even though the chopper (headed to the freighter when it blew up. Yeah, this part is a bit problematic. Spray some suspension of disbelief on it and maybe it will feel better.

  32. Addendum to the Temple theory: if you’re not alive at the time Ben turned the Frozen Donkey Wheel (or not on the island or within its radius), then obviously, no time skipping. There’s no reason to think that time skipping would affect those who died or left the island before the sky went white.

  33. JamesD: Right, so Jin skipping through time actually supports Greg’s theory that those in the Temple at the time the Frozen Donkey Wheel was turned do not skip through time.

    Just for the record, the time travel doesn’t bother me. Rather, the set of times in which Locke et al. find themselves doesn’t bother me.

    The look on Jin’s face when Danielle introduced herself was awesome.

    Finally, even though she clearly requested the gun, I bet Sun was still a little ticked about the missing second tray of chocolates. I know I would be. Did anyone with HD see a brown smudge around the mouth of her delivery boy? LOL.

  34. And Jin he was somehow blasted into the radius of the island, even though the chopper (headed to the freighter when it blew up. Yeah, this part is a bit problematic.

    You just have to be in contact with the island or the surrounding water. That’s why the chopper didn’t skip. But if some dancer/acrobat on the island had been mid-leap, they’d have landed in the ocean when the island vanished. (Add that to your disbelief spray.)

    Wasn’t the freighter moving in close to the island before Keamy’s bomb blew up? Jin may have already been inside the radius.

  35. I found it a little under-motivated to have Kate say she couldn’t lose someone she was so close to. At the time of her saying that, she had been taking care of Aaron for what, a day? And before this she had shown no real discernable interest in him that I can recall.

  36. John, I don’t think that was true (as the birthing scene last night demonstrated). But I think Kate’s feelings towards Aaron arose more from when she thought she was pregnant.

    The issue of why Jin would survive and not the rest of the folks on the freighter – especially other losties – is a big one.

  37. Clark,

    Actually, I thought the scene with Sawyer watching Claire and Kate showed the writers knew they hadn’t strongly established the link. There was no other real purpose for the scene. After Claire gave birth, Kate was back to playing love triangle with Jack and Sawyer and didn’t give the tyke another thought.

    It’s not really important, I just thought it was actually a funny case of them trying to establish motivation for her actions with Aaron when no motivation was needed. I had never questioned why she would want to keep Aaron. Why wouldn’t she?

    I must say I’m enjoying this season. Very fast paced. No throw away episodes like in seasons past.

  38. I agree that before they left the island Kate showed little interest – I seem to recall a scene when she felt very awkward even holding him.

    However, it makes sense to me that her feelings changed. At the moment of rescue, she was conflicted with regret over those left behind, guilt about Jin, upset/guilt about Sawyer, in contrast to elation of getting off the island and being grateful that at least Jack made it with her. She also knows she’s going back to a world where she has no family (unlike Sun and Hurley for example) and remains a fugitive of sorts.

    I think she saw Aaron as both a responsibility to all those left behind, a way to make up for her guilt, and a way to start a new life, anchored, with a new family, and an opportunity for normalcy for the first time in her life.

  39. John, that’s a good point. Most of the business with Claire’s baby was Locke or Charlie.

    Jenny, now that you mention it I remember that scene also. However I really think the pregnancy issue changed things for her.

  40. A question and a thought about the title:

    My question is about the boat the Losties were in when they were being shot at just before the time jump. This was a boat they never saw before, and thus belonged to that particular moment in time. In all other time jumps so far, the Losties and only their own personal belongings (clothes, backpacks, etc.) followed them to the new time. All other items — the tents, the campsite, etc. — disappeared. So why were they still in the boat after the time jump, when it was clear later in the episode that they jumped to an earlier time when the boat did not exist? Why didn’t they get dumped into the drink when the time jump occurred?

    And my comment about the title of the episode “The Little Prince:” the little Prince in the original story was a messiah figure who dies and is resurrected. This plays into the earlier comment by ESQuire who noticed the name game going on with Christian/Shephard/Aaron. Add Jacob as another Bible name. This may even dovetail with the other theory about reincarnation and the possible hope of the Others to reincarnate Jacob — and maybe other former leaders — in the children born on the island.

    This can explain Ben’s deep interest in Alex, the Other’s interest in Aaron, etc. (Side note: “Benjamin” is the name one of the 12 Lost Tribes of Israel — also note the show’s mysterious reference to the Temple).

    The Others may be a Messianic Cult using Time Travel to bring their Messiah (Jacob) back to life.

    If this theory holds, I believe that Aaron will be revealed to be the Messiah, and is thus the Little Prince of the title.

    I don’t think, then, that Locke is the messiah, but rather is the person “making way” for the messiah, i.e., the island’s answer to John the Baptist. Thus his name: John Locke, the man named John who holds the key to the “way, the truth, and the life.”

    In case you think I’m some right-wing Christian nut, I’m not. I am familiar with recurring mythological themes, however, and “Lost” is loaded with them.

  41. Finally watched the show yesterday. If they can have Sawyer watch the scene with Kate and Claire, are they going to have scenes where the Season5 people actually interact with the past people?

    Does that explain the sudden incongruous appearance of people on the island in past episodes? Are they visions, or future visitors? How about the voices/whispers in the jungle?

  42. I don’t think time travel can explain “ghosts” appearing. Consider Charlie who drowned and would never have known about that encounter with Hurley.

    I just want them to explain that really weird vision of Charlie. And Charlie’s really, really weird behavior.

  43. [“So Kate came up with the idea to claim Aaron as her own. I guess she didn’t want to turn him over to strangers. Remember the Malkin the psychic’s admonition to Claire that “You mustn’t allow another to raise your baby” way back in season 1? I wonder if Claire ever shared this with Kate. Probably not. In part, it was selfish, based on her feeling that she couldn’t lose another person close to her.”]

    What do you mean “in part, it was selfish”? Kate had acted in a selfish manner . . . period. She convinced Jack to lie about Aaron’s parentage in order to keep him for herself for VERY selfish reasons. And then both she and Jack had the nerve to treat Carole Littleton as some villainess out to kidnap Aaron, when the latter had a legitimate claim for the kid, due to being his grandmother.

    That scene in which Jack and Kate expressed anxiety over Carole Littleton’s appearance disgusted me.

  44. What is even more disgusting is that many fans saw nothing wrong with Kate’s actions. People are weird.

  45. When Lost ended it left a hole in my life. I still haven’t recovered.

    It may not have been the best TV show ever, but for me it certainly is the most missed.

  46. Wow, I had the exact opposite reaction. Having seen every episode, I now regret the many hours I spent watching the show.

  47. Really Brian? I was thinking how deprived I was by there being no “must watch” TV. Yes I was pretty annoyed at the ending – although honestly I didn’t find it bad. I just felt like they’d set up so many threads that went nowhere – especially in the first season.

    When Justified restarts though I’m going to do writeups. That’ll be a much more satisfying show than Walking Dead. But there’s nothing really like Lost.

  48. What Lost did that very few shows have ever done is create a community around its very self.

    The act of watching live or nearly live every week than immediately engaging in thoughtful discussion, pulling on threads from literature, science, and philosophy, than repeating the ritual week after week. It was not unlike religious observance, and, of course, all drama has its roots in religious festival, so to me, as disappointed as some fans were, to end the show with one of the most overtly religious episodes of television ever broadcast on network TV was more than fitting.

  49. I’m just happy to see that someone revived one of my old Lost threads.

    I was mildly disappointed with the way the series ended. But I don’t regret watching. So many hours of really great entertainment more than make up for the show’s faults. What I miss is the way the show was so dense with meanings, allusions and repeated motifs. You jusy don’t find that very often in a TV show.

  50. I would say that I was emotionally satisfied by the show’s ending but not intellectually, if that makes sense.

  51. Well, now. Here we are again…

    I had no problem with the ending. I knew well in advance that the writers could never come up with an end to the many storylines in a way satisfying to everyone. I wasn’t bothered because, to me, the show was primarily about the mystery, and not about the answers. I think the writers were surprised by the virtual community of fans that sprung up the first season, and how so many fans obsessed on details that the writers probably tossed off without thinking through the detail’s relationship to the Big Picture. So they had to double-back somewhat and create an Island back-story that (my guess) wasn’t in their mind at the beginning of the show.

    They clearly had fun writing the show, however, and weaved many allusions to literature, psychology, religion, mythology, sociology, and philosophy into their storylines, sets, and props. And as Brian G pointed out, half the fun of the show was discussion and chewing over these references (whether or not they led to any “answers”) in between episode airings.

    Some of this went on with certain shows before Lost (X-Files with its overarching alien mythology), and some shows do it today (Fringe and Community come to mind, though neither show does it to the same extent as Lost). But Lost was master of the Easter Egg, the reference-within-a-reference. If you didn’t watch the show with total focus, and if an episode didn’t drive you to your keyboard to research various topics, you missed 90% of what went on.

  52. For those of us who never watched the show, would most of you recommend starting with the first episode and watching all the episodes through to the end, or would you recommend skipping part or all of it?

    I sometimes feel I missed out on something by not watching Lost, but when I hear the criticism of the ending and some of the other issues that have been raised, I start to think maybe I’m better off.

  53. If you’re going to watch, you can’t really skip around. It probably wouldn’t be a bad idea to stop at the end of the first season, since that’s when they were still being true to the show’s original (and, IMO, infinitely more compelling) conceit.

  54. Yes, it’s definitely a show you have to watch from beginning to end. But you can always visit the Kulturblog threads to see what everyone was thinking. (Usually our guesses were wrong) It’s worth the commitment especially if you don’t have ridiculously unrealistic expectations about the finale the way most of us did.

  55. [“So Kate came up with the idea to claim Aaron as her own. I guess she didn’t want to turn him over to strangers.”]

    For God’s sake, she was being a selfish bitch. Couldn’t you see that? She, Jack and the other O6 didn’t even bother to find out if any of Claire’s family was still alive. And even after she learned of Carole Littleton’s existence, she kept Aaron for another two years.

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