Lost: What Secrets Do You Want To Know?

As the producers and writers never tire of pointing out, they have answered a lot of questions over the past three years. The problem is that some early questions haven’t come close to being answered, some appear to have been forgotten, and of course for every answered question there are three new questions raised.

So what are your top questions to see answered?

1. What is the black mist monster? Yeah, I think we got a lot of hints that the mysterious ghostly Jacob may be the mist monster. But are we sure? And of course if Jacob is the mist monster that merely raises a ton more questions. Like why the Others left the fence on to defend against the monster. And why the monster keeps killing people.

2. Charlie’s Craziness Anyone remember this episode because it seems like the producers have forgotten, other than a brief apology to Sun. But there was a whole Charlie-centric episode with pointless flashbacks but important present day actions. Charlie has these vivid Catholic inspired visions even though he is not on heroin anymore. This leads to an attempt to baptize baby Aaron which everyone else thinks is Charlie potentially killing Aaron. Locke then punches Charlie out. The nature of the visions has never been explained. Further, only a week later Lost time, Charlie is back in everyone’s good graces including Claire – which always struck me as inexplicable. Please explain this. It bugs me more than even the more obvious questions.

3. Why does no one share secrets? What is up with all the secrecy. Jack appears to keep everything secret whether it makes any sense or not. He did that with the hatch, with Ben in the hatch and then the secrets of the Others when he returned from captivity. Locke has tons of secrets, but at least his make sense to keep quiet. However sometimes it seems like no one is putting two and two together. Further, no one appears to question each other. Yeah we’ll get a throw away line on this occasionally. But we need more of an explanation.

4. How did they survive the crash? Let’s be honest. If a plane tears up in the air no one is surviving. Certainly not the way the Losties have. Is this the island/Jakob? The flashback of Desmond suggests that he was partially responsible for the plane crash. Since then there have been hints he isn’t. What’s the deal?

5. What is up with the time travel? After denying time travel was part of the show they now admit it is. (Which, after the Desmond episode that opened up the second half of season-3 was pretty clear) However producers are also pretty critical of the paradox filled time travel stories such as we see on Heroes. So there are big limits on time travel. What are they though? Did Desmond change the past? Who was that mysterious lady and her friend at the monastery? Does the flash forward of Jack suggest we’re going to skip forward a few years or is there time travel? I don’t know.

Honorable mentions:

Is there a reason for the intertwined past of all the characters? Is Ben a good guy or bad guy? Is Penny’s Dad part of Dharma? Are the numbers mystical sympathetic relations or is this science fiction rather than fantasy?

Advertisements

26 thoughts on “Lost: What Secrets Do You Want To Know?

  1. I want to know how Eko’s plane (the one with his dead brother on it) got so far off course.

  2. Share your questions; have no answers.

    Also, how about the four-toed giant statue? Seems as though the writers have completely forgotten about that ah-ha moment from the season finale of season 2.

  3. I don’t think the four toed statue has been ignored. Indeed I’d lay really good odds that Richard has four toes.

    Ecko’s plane is a good one though. My guess is that the island isn’t anywhere in particular but that something needs happen to get there. So the plane was brought there much like the plane of the losties was. Of course this poses problems for our parachutist. I guess we’ll learn about that next season – especially if they start immediately after the call rather than after the flash forward.

  4. I would like to know why there was a plane discovered with all of the losties bodies on it, so that no one would come looking for them? This question was almost discarded immediately after coming across it, not even the losties seemed to question that when it was first revealed.

  5. I always thought that they would do a flashback with Yemi’s plane that would explain how they got off-course, how they crashed but didn’t die (in true Lost fashion) and they explored the island, got some answers, something caused them to run back to the plane, and then they died, and that is how Locke/Boone discovered them. Yemi was already dead when he was thrown on the plane, right?

    But, perhaps that storyline died with Eko’s storyline.

    I think they have to answer the Walt question: is he special? They set that up since season 1 and reinforced it time after time in season 2. They switched gears all of a sudden and made it seem like Ben’s ruse was just to get a back surgeon…that Walt wasn’t the target at all; which goes against all indications and plot devices of the first two seasons.

    I’d be disappointed if they don’t address that at all. Perhaps with Walt’s hitting puberty, it is an impossibility.

  6. Clark,

    Why does no one share secrets?

    The answer to that is, if they do share secrets, then any compelling drama is taken out, because most of the drama in the show comes from the little secrets people hold on to that if they just simply told like it is, would wipe away the fog of mystery from the story.

    A question I have is, why, after gassing forty people, abducting children in the middle of the night, and generally doing things against others’ will do the Others think they are “good?” Don’t they have ANY sense of ethics and morality?

  7. Why do all women who become pregnant (on the island) die?

    What happens to the children who are kidnapped? Where are they kept?

  8. I might post my own list later, but first, here are my responses to Clark’s questions:

    1. I think we’ve actually learned quite a bit about this question this season and last, and we’ll learn more about it in season 4. In fact, I think we’ve made about as much progress in understanding the Smoke Monster as we have any of the island’s mysteries.

    2. There are a lot of hallucinatory experiences that people seem to have on the island, so Charlie’s not alone there. I think we’ll find that more of these will tie back to No. 1, but I do think we’ll find out more about the vision-giving powers of the island in the coming seasons, just not a lot about Charlie specifically.

    3. I think we already know the answer to this, to some extent. We’ve learned that most, if not all of the characters have details about their pasts that they want to conceal, and that they are a distrustful lot. There’s also a power dynamic going on that keeps people hording, rather than sharing, information. On another level, I think the writers believe this makes better storytelling. (And I think they are right.) Endless exposition just isn’t good script writing.

    4. This one has to be chalked up entirely to suspension of disbelief and I don’t think we’ll ever find out the “answer” to this question. I think this was a necessary artifice for the show’s premise. After all, “hundreds killed in plane crash” doesn’t give you much to build a television series on. Similarly, it wasn’t necessary to understanding why all those kids survived their plane crash to appreciate “Lord of the Flies.”

    5. Desmond’s experience isn’t quite like time travel. It’s more similar to precognition. After all, Desmond isn’t actually traveling back in the past to change events. He merely receives fractured flashes of the possible future. I still don’t believe that time travel is a major part of LOST, though I could be wrong.

    Honorable mentions:

    – The characters lives are intertwined because, again, it makes for good storytelling. Likewise, the characters in a Dickens novel are intertwined. I believe the creators have said that this is not a question they are interested in answering.

    – Ben is obviously evil, though he doesn’t believe himself to be. I think we’ve gotten a lot of information about this already, and will probably get at least a little bit more.

    – I think there is information outside the canon of the TV show that indicates that Widmore Industries is in some way affiliated with the Hanso Organization. This connection was made pretty directly in the LOST-universe-inspired novel “The Bad Twin” (although it was a different, U.S. branch of the Widmore clan). I think Widmore (as well as Paik) were tied to Hanso in the ARG “The Lost Experience.” I expect that we will find out more about how they are connected in the coming seasons.

    – I think the show has moved on from the numbers. The “Lost Experience” ARG did explain them as part of the Valenzetti Equation and the DHARMA Initiative’s ultimate purpose for being on the island. In the end, though, the numbers were simply a storytelling devise used during the first two seasons to give texture to the story. (According to an interview with LOST director Jack Bender, Damon Lindelof apparently came up with them while the writing team was working on Hurley’s first episode.) I think the numbers have faded into almost irrelevance at this point.

  9. BTD Greg, I’m glad you brought up the numbers. That was one of my questions from time to time and I’ve basically just forgotten to write it.

    Those numbers did seem to be very important at first. I wonder if they failed to figure out how to explain them and so they abandoned that plot thread.

  10. I guess I’m still really annoyed with not knowing exactly what happened to Ecko, Charlie, Desmond, and Locke when the hatch exploded.

    I also haven’t forgotten about the special watch Paik gave Jin. I always thought that it would pay off sometime in some way. I may be the only LOST fan in the country that still cares about it.

  11. Walt is an other good one. This is actually one reason why I think they may shift to the present. Clearly when the cast Walt they knew he’d grow up. So this had to be in the plan. Walt reminds me of those characters from Steven King’s novels where they are put in a city to try and break some scaffolding for existence. Many noted that the obituary seemed to have a long of Dark Tower references.

    Of course they won’t be following King too overtly any more than they are Forbidden Planet. But I’d lay good odds that Walt is somehow tapping into the island just as Hurley with his luck did.

    Regarding Desmond, I honestly believe he went back in time and that the photo he had he didn’t have in the original time line.

    I disagree about the numbers. I still think they are very important. I seem to recall an interview with the producers who said the first half of the show (seasons 1-3) is about fate whereas the second half is about freedom. I’ll lay very good odds that we’ll start to get more about Dharma next season and thus the numbers.

    The only reason I didn’t bring up the numbers is because I think so much has been revealed about them.

  12. Call me stubborn, but I have yet to recognize the Lost Experience as “canon.” Perhaps I am shouting in the vast oblivion, but I am frustrated that so much apparently was revealed during an online game. I don’t even know what the game revealed, because I figured it would be discussed in the episodes…where it should come out.

    Perhaps the Lost Experience was a cop out, a way to advance the plot (get us old-timers to forget about the Numbers) so they could introduce a different concept…

  13. Call me stubborn, but I have yet to recognize the Lost Experience as “canon.” Perhaps I am shouting in the vast oblivion, but I am frustrated that so much apparently was revealed during an online game. I don’t even know what the game revealed, because I figured it would be discussed in the episodes…where it should come out.

    Perhaps the Lost Experience was a cop out, a way to advance the plot (get us old-timers to forget about the Numbers) so they could introduce a different concept…

    I think I agree about all of this. The Lost Experience isn’t “canon,” but I think it’s all consistent with the overall story. I also think it was a chance to provide a bit more detail while at the same time, closing the door on certain plot elements that the show didn’t really plan to pursue within the series (i.e., the numbers, intrigue surrounding the influence of Alvar Hanso, etc.).

    The ARG was also a marketing experiment that produced mixed results. There’s no indication that the show’s producers plan to try anything like that again.

    I didn’t follow the ARG very closely at all, but most of what was revealed there can be found out by perusing Lostpedia.com for a half hour or so and watching the Sri Lanka Video.

  14. Thanks for the link. OK, so I watched the video…it doesn’t seem like Lost to me at all, more like Blair Witch Project. Oh well…

    Some other questions I’d like answered

    1. the Black Rock
    2. Rousseau and her crew’s fate

    I have a hunch that these questions might tie in nicely to the four toes, Jacob, more into Ben, etc…

    I think the Charlie “night and day” switch was probably a change out of expedience. That story must not have ended up the way they wanted, or they decided they needed to have Charlie likable again. It reminds me of “Thank You for Smoking” where they are debating the ability to smoke in space…so they add the one line about “good thing scientists were able to…”

  15. I’d be pretty pissed if The Lost Experience were misdirection. Ditto for comments on the podcast. (Although they did say time travel wasn’t going to be in the show as I recall)

  16. On the clip show (the newest one) Lindelof and Cuse address some of these. (Still incomplete answers in most cases but somewhat interesting.)

    “Sometimes you answer a question but another question crops up as a result” (Lindelof).

    “Desmond failed to enter the code in the computer in the hatch” (Cuse). “As a result 815 crashes” (Lindelof). “That is the definitive answer as to why the plane crashed. The electromagnetic pulse shot out of the hatch, fried the instrumentation on the plane, and the plane crashed” (Cuse).

    “The first mystery of the island was when all of a sudden the trees were moving and our characters heard a noise and they’re wondering what the heck was going on out there” (Cuse). “The first question is, What does that thing look like? Is it a dinosaur? Is the monster man-made? We don’t know. Does the monster have some sort of ability to judge you? Locke passed it the first time he saw it but then later on the monster grabbed him and tried to pull him into a hole. And then, what does it do with that judgment, is a very sort of interesting question as we move forward on the show” (Lindelof). “Now, we’ve seen what it looks like on several occasions. It’s this sort of column of mysterious black smoke. This season, when the monster experiences Juliet, we see several flashes, almost as if it’s taking pictures of her. Is the monster a manifestation of the island? We don’t know. We do know that when it looks at you, it seems to be able to process certain memories you may have had” (Lindelof).

    Questions I’d like to see resolved: Why do pregnant women die? (What exactly is “it” that happens at conception?) Why was Libby in the mental institution? Who really sent Naomi? How is it that it seems Richard hasn’t aged since Ben was a child (at the least)? What is the deal with Jacob? (And his list?) And what do the Others mean when they call someone “special”?

  17. My questions.

    Walt
    Pregnancy
    Black Rock
    Island healing power
    How long have the Other’s been on the island?

    3. Why does no one share secrets? What is up with all the secrecy. Jack appears to keep everything secret whether it makes any sense or not. He did that with the hatch, with Ben in the hatch and then the secrets of the Others when he returned from captivity. Locke has tons of secrets, but at least his make sense to keep quiet. However sometimes it seems like no one is putting two and two together. Further, no one appears to question each other. Yeah we’ll get a throw away line on this occasionally. But we need more of an explanation.

    This annoys me, but I guess it would ruin the show. It does seem like it’s used as a cop-out sometimes though. At least make them answer each other’s questions when it’s in character. As I’ve posted here in the past, it really annoys me when a real person would ask a certain question that a Lost character refuses to ask (recent examples include exchanges between Kate/Julia/Jack).

  18. Ditto JJohnsen. I don’t mind keeping the viewer in the dark. However most of the characters are in the dark too. So having characters act in inexplicable fashions purely to keep the audience in the dark is simply bad writing.

    I don’t think this is always what’s going on. And sometimes I think it actually makes sense given the character. (So Jack’s stupid secrets don’t bother me and certainly Locke’s don’t – I think it fits in with what we know about the characters) Other characters though simply need much more explanation. Explanation we don’t get.

  19. Yes, Libby and the mental institution. That’s the question I want answered. I really wish they could have had a better conclusion to that storyline. Why did they kill her off? Please tell me it wasn’t because of the drinking/driving thing. That would be lame.

  20. How about what killed the pilot in the, um, pilot episode? Can we definitely say it was Smoky?

    The whispers are another mystery I like to hear more about.

    Re: OP #4: I know nobody watches this, but the finale of Crossing Jordan had a plane crash and a section of the plane survived, along with one non-cast flight crew member. Briefly.

    Of course, that was an improvised crash landing, compared to the shots of the Lost plane breaking up mid-flight.

  21. I think it was definitely clear that the pilot was killed by the smoke monster.

    The whispers appear to have been answered. They are Jacob. (Note how they appeared to Locke just before the doppleganger of Walt appeared)

    I think they killed off Libby to make Michael’s act so atrocious and to further the Hurley character’s development. I’ve said all along that Hurley, while not getting all the attention, is arguably the most important character on the show after Locke.

  22. As already stated, some secrets are needed for dramatic purposes. Lost seems to employ this tactic above and beyond what is usually acceptable. There are other ways to massage the drama besides secrets, sappy music and slow motion.

  23. “The four-toed statue is something we will get to next season,” Cuse revealed.

    Oooh, nice.

    I think the odds of Jacob having four toes just increased.

  24. What’s really interesting in that link, Greg, was the admission of a way lame plot hole in Heroes. Tim Kring says about why Peter just didn’t fly away, “You know, theoretically you’re not supposed to be thinking about that.” And, “But the real explanation is that we wanted Nathan to show up and [save the day]!”

    That’s what makes both shows pretty lame. They cut corners to make something happen they want. I think Lost is far better, despite the naysayers. The Heroes finale just made me more perturbed the more I thought about it. The Lost finale just gets better…

  25. Yeah, he can stop bullets coming at him through his peripheral vision, but he can’t stop a guy running straight at him with a sword? 😉

    The Lost finale was much better.

Comments are closed.